Treatments

Current NHS costs can be obtained by clicking the NHS link at the bottom of this section. Below is a list of private treatments available at Caledonian Dental Care. Please click on the treatment links for more information or email us with any enquiries you may have.

Treatments
Private
Dental Plan
Routine Consultation
£38.00
Free of charge
New Patient Examination
£55.00
£46.75
Small X-rays
£10.00
Free of charge
Large X-rays
£39.00
Free of charge
Hygienist Visit
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Hygienist Appointments

Caledonian Dental Care has highly qualified hygienists as part of our Team. They work with patients to design individual oral hygiene programmes, helping prevent and treat gum disease- the most common cause of tooth loss.

During your appointment the hygienist will demonstrate oral health procedures and products in a relaxed and friendly environment. So for healthy gums, a brighter smile and fresh breath arrange an appointment with one of our hygienists. £43 per 30 minute appointment.

Prophy Mate Polishing

Would you like a brighter smile?

We now have a Prophy Mate polishing machine. It works by spraying a bicarbonate of soda mixture through pressurised air which removes any visible staining.

It is safe, non-destructive to your tooth enamel and pain free!
It does not change the colour of your teeth, but it removes staining which can build up from smoking, tea, coffee or red wine. Perfect for a special occasion.

Add a Prophy Mate Polish to your hygienist appointment for an extra £5.

Periodontal Therapy

What is gum disease?

Gum disease describes swelling, soreness or infection of the tissues supporting the teeth. There are two main forms of gum disease: gingivitis and periodontal disease.

What is gingivitis?

Gingivitis means inflammation of the gums. This is when the gums around the teeth become very red and swollen. Often the swollen gums bleed when they are brushed during cleaning.

What is periodontal disease?

Long-standing gingivitis can turn into periodontal disease. There are a number of types of periodontal disease and they all affect the tissues supporting the teeth. As the disease gets worse the bone anchoring the teeth in the jaw is lost, making the teeth loose. If this is not treated, the teeth may eventually fall out. In fact, more teeth are lost through periodontal disease than through tooth decay.

What is the cause of gum disease?

All gum disease is caused by plaque. Plaque is a film of bacteria which forms on the surface of the teeth and gums every day. Many of the bacteria in plaque are completely harmless, but there are some that have been shown to be the main cause of gum disease. To prevent and treat gum disease, you need to make sure you remove all the plaque from your teeth every day. This is done by brushing and flossing.

What happens if gum disease is not treated?

Unfortunately, gum disease progresses painlessly on the whole so that you do notice the damage it is doing. However, the bacteria are sometimes more active and this makes your gums sore. This can lead to gum abscesses, and pus may ooze from around the teeth. Over a number of years, the bone supporting the teeth can be lost. If the disease is left untreated for a long time, treatment can become more difficult.

What treatments are needed?

Your dentist will usually give your teeth a thorough clean. You’ll also be shown how to remove plaque successfully yourself, cleaning all surfaces of your teeth thoroughly and effectively. This may take a number of sessions with the dentist or hygienist.

What else may be needed?

Once your teeth are clean, your dentist may decide to carry out further cleaning of the roots of the teeth, to make sure that the last pockets of bacteria are removed. This is known as root planing. You’ll probably need the treatment area to be numbed before anything is done. Afterwards, you may feel some discomfort for up to 48 hours.

Once I have had periodontal disease, can I get it again?

The periodontal diseases are never cured. But as long as you keep up the home care you have been taught, any further loss of bone will be very slow and it may stop altogether. However, you must make sure you remove plaque every day, and go for regular check ups by the dentist and hygienist.

£47.50
Two free visits per year
Hygienist Visit with Prophy Polish
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Hygienist Appointments

Caledonian Dental Care has highly qualified hygienists as part of our Team. They work with patients to design individual oral hygiene programmes, helping prevent and treat gum disease- the most common cause of tooth loss.

During your appointment the hygienist will demonstrate oral health procedures and products in a relaxed and friendly environment. So for healthy gums, a brighter smile and fresh breath arrange an appointment with one of our hygienists. £43 per 30 minute appointment.

Prophy Mate Polishing

Would you like a brighter smile?

We now have a Prophy Mate polishing machine. It works by spraying a bicarbonate of soda mixture through pressurised air which removes any visible staining.

It is safe, non-destructive to your tooth enamel and pain free!
It does not change the colour of your teeth, but it removes staining which can build up from smoking, tea, coffee or red wine. Perfect for a special occasion.

Add a Prophy Mate Polish to your hygienist appointment for an extra £5.

Periodontal Therapy

What is gum disease?

Gum disease describes swelling, soreness or infection of the tissues supporting the teeth. There are two main forms of gum disease: gingivitis and periodontal disease.

What is gingivitis?

Gingivitis means inflammation of the gums. This is when the gums around the teeth become very red and swollen. Often the swollen gums bleed when they are brushed during cleaning.

What is periodontal disease?

Long-standing gingivitis can turn into periodontal disease. There are a number of types of periodontal disease and they all affect the tissues supporting the teeth. As the disease gets worse the bone anchoring the teeth in the jaw is lost, making the teeth loose. If this is not treated, the teeth may eventually fall out. In fact, more teeth are lost through periodontal disease than through tooth decay.

What is the cause of gum disease?

All gum disease is caused by plaque. Plaque is a film of bacteria which forms on the surface of the teeth and gums every day. Many of the bacteria in plaque are completely harmless, but there are some that have been shown to be the main cause of gum disease. To prevent and treat gum disease, you need to make sure you remove all the plaque from your teeth every day. This is done by brushing and flossing.

What happens if gum disease is not treated?

Unfortunately, gum disease progresses painlessly on the whole so that you do notice the damage it is doing. However, the bacteria are sometimes more active and this makes your gums sore. This can lead to gum abscesses, and pus may ooze from around the teeth. Over a number of years, the bone supporting the teeth can be lost. If the disease is left untreated for a long time, treatment can become more difficult.

What treatments are needed?

Your dentist will usually give your teeth a thorough clean. You’ll also be shown how to remove plaque successfully yourself, cleaning all surfaces of your teeth thoroughly and effectively. This may take a number of sessions with the dentist or hygienist.

What else may be needed?

Once your teeth are clean, your dentist may decide to carry out further cleaning of the roots of the teeth, to make sure that the last pockets of bacteria are removed. This is known as root planing. You’ll probably need the treatment area to be numbed before anything is done. Afterwards, you may feel some discomfort for up to 48 hours.

Once I have had periodontal disease, can I get it again?

The periodontal diseases are never cured. But as long as you keep up the home care you have been taught, any further loss of bone will be very slow and it may stop altogether. However, you must make sure you remove plaque every day, and go for regular check ups by the dentist and hygienist.

£53.50
£45.47
Amalgam Fillings
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Dental Restorations

I need a filling – what types are there?

There are a number of different fillings including: • amalgam (silver coloured) • composite fillings (tooth coloured) • glass ionomer (tooth coloured) • gold inlays and onlays (gold coloured) • porcelain inlays (tooth coloured).

What are amalgam fillings?

Amalgam fillings are silver coloured. They are made by combining mercury and a silver alloy (50% mercury, 35% silver, 15% tin, copper and other metals). Amalgam is long lasting and hard wearing and has been used in fillings for at least 150 years. It is economical to use and it is not unusual for an amalgam filling to last 15 to 20 years. This kind of filling is normally used on the back ‘chewing’ teeth. Before the filling can be placed, the area must be prepared by removing all the decay and shaping the cavity to hold the filling in place. If the tooth is badly broken, your dentist may need to place a small stainless steel pin to help secure the filling.

What are composite fillings?

Composite fillings are strong, but may not be as hard wearing as amalgam fillings. Composite fillings are tooth coloured and are made from powdered glass quartz, silica or other ceramic particles added to a resin base. After the tooth is prepared, the filling is bonded onto the area and a light shone onto it to set it. The dentist will choose a shade to match your existing teeth, although over time staining can happen.

What are glass ionomer fillings?

Glass ionomer fillings form a chemical link with the tooth. They may also release fluoride, which helps to prevent further tooth decay. This type of filling is fairly weak and, because of this, is usually limited to use on baby teeth and non-biting surfaces such as around the necks of the teeth. Little preparation is needed as the filling bonds directly to the tooth.

What are gold inlays and onlays?

These can be used in most areas of the mouth. An inlay is small and within the biting surface of the tooth. An onlay can cover a larger area of the tooth. Gold is the most long lasting and hard wearing filling material and will last for many years. An advantage of gold is that it does not tarnish and has great strength. One of the differences between gold and other filling materials is that the gold filling is made in a laboratory. Your dentist will usually take an impression of the prepared cavity and send it to the laboratory for the technician to make the inlay or onlay. In the meantime a temporary filling will be placed in the cavity. After the gold inlay or onlay has been made, your dentist will fix it in place with dental cement. 

What are porcelain inlays?

Porcelain inlays are made in a laboratory but this will need at least two visits to your dentist. Porcelain can be hard wearing and long lasting and also has the benefit of being able to be coloured to match your natural tooth. 

Where can I get more information about fillings?

Your dentist will advise you on what kind of filling material is suited to your situation. Discuss with your dentist if you would like a particular type of filling material such as tooth-coloured fillings.

£45.50 - £97.00
£38.68 - £82.45
White Fillings
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Dental Restorations

I need a filling – what types are there?

There are a number of different fillings including: • amalgam (silver coloured) • composite fillings (tooth coloured) • glass ionomer (tooth coloured) • gold inlays and onlays (gold coloured) • porcelain inlays (tooth coloured).

What are amalgam fillings?

Amalgam fillings are silver coloured. They are made by combining mercury and a silver alloy (50% mercury, 35% silver, 15% tin, copper and other metals). Amalgam is long lasting and hard wearing and has been used in fillings for at least 150 years. It is economical to use and it is not unusual for an amalgam filling to last 15 to 20 years. This kind of filling is normally used on the back ‘chewing’ teeth. Before the filling can be placed, the area must be prepared by removing all the decay and shaping the cavity to hold the filling in place. If the tooth is badly broken, your dentist may need to place a small stainless steel pin to help secure the filling.

What are composite fillings?

Composite fillings are strong, but may not be as hard wearing as amalgam fillings. Composite fillings are tooth coloured and are made from powdered glass quartz, silica or other ceramic particles added to a resin base. After the tooth is prepared, the filling is bonded onto the area and a light shone onto it to set it. The dentist will choose a shade to match your existing teeth, although over time staining can happen.

What are glass ionomer fillings?

Glass ionomer fillings form a chemical link with the tooth. They may also release fluoride, which helps to prevent further tooth decay. This type of filling is fairly weak and, because of this, is usually limited to use on baby teeth and non-biting surfaces such as around the necks of the teeth. Little preparation is needed as the filling bonds directly to the tooth.

What are gold inlays and onlays?

These can be used in most areas of the mouth. An inlay is small and within the biting surface of the tooth. An onlay can cover a larger area of the tooth. Gold is the most long lasting and hard wearing filling material and will last for many years. An advantage of gold is that it does not tarnish and has great strength. One of the differences between gold and other filling materials is that the gold filling is made in a laboratory. Your dentist will usually take an impression of the prepared cavity and send it to the laboratory for the technician to make the inlay or onlay. In the meantime a temporary filling will be placed in the cavity. After the gold inlay or onlay has been made, your dentist will fix it in place with dental cement. This type of filling is more expensive.

What are porcelain inlays?

Porcelain inlays are made in a laboratory but this will need at least two visits to your dentist. Porcelain can be hard wearing and long lasting and also has the benefit of being able to be coloured to match your natural tooth. Again, this type of filling can be quite expensive.

Where can I get more information about fillings?

Your dentist will advise you on what kind of filling material is suited to your situation. Discuss with your dentist if you would like a particular type of filling material such as tooth-coloured fillings.

£77 - £128
£65.45 - £108.80
Extraction
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A routine extraction, removal, of a tooth can be done at the Practice by your regular dentist under local anaesthetic in a relaxed and familiar environment.

Although no one looks forward to a trip to the dentist and least of all an extraction, we will endeavour to the make the experience as comfortable as possible.

£50.50
£42.93 
Porcelain Bonded Crowns
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Crowns and Bridges

What is a Crown?

A Crown is an artificial restoration that fits over the remaining part of a prepared tooth, making it strong and giving it the shape of a natural tooth. A crown is sometimes known as a ‘cap’.

What is a Post Crown?

In root-filled teeth it may be necessary to insert a post before placing a crown. A post provides support and helps the crown stay in place. The weakened crown of the tooth may be shortened to gum level. A post can be made of prefabricated stainless steel or a fibre white post which the dentist can fit directly into the root canal, or a custom-made post can be constructed by the dental technician to accurately fit the shape of the prepared root canal. The post is placed into the root canal and cemented in position, ready for the crown to be attached.

What is a Bridge?

A Bridge is made by putting crowns on the teeth at either side of the space, and then joining these two crowns together by placing a false tooth in the space. This is all made in the laboratory and then the pieces are cemented into place with special adhesives. The bridge can’t be removed. Another option is an adhesive bridge. This has wings that are bonded to the back of the supporting teeth with very little drilling involved.

Why would I need a crown?

Crowns are an ideal restoration for teeth that have been broken, or have been weakened by decay or a very large filling. A crown could be used for a number of other reasons, for instance: 
• you may have discoloured fillings and would like to improve the appearance of the tooth
• you may have had a root filling which will need a crown to protect it
• it may help hold a bridge or denture firmly in place.

What are crowns made of?

Crowns can be made of a variety of different materials and new materials are continually being introduced. Some of the most popular options are listed below.

Porcelain fused to metal: this is what most crowns are made from. A precious or non-precious metal base is made and then porcelain is applied in layers over it.

All-ceramic crowns: this modern technique offers a metal-free alternative, which can give the strength of a bonded crown and the appearance of a porcelain crown. Therefore it is suitable for use in all areas of the mouth.

Porcelain fused to zirconia: these crowns are the latest development in material technology in dentistry. A zirconium oxide framework is made and then porcelain applied in layers over it to give an outstandingly natural appearance.

Metal alloy crowns: gold is one of the oldest filling materials. Today it is used with other metal alloys to increase its strength, which makes it a very hardwearing restoration. These crowns are white or gold in colour.

What are bridges made of?

Bridges usually made of porcelain bonded to precious metal. Sometimes, there are other non-precious metals used in the base for strength. There are also new bridges made entirely of a special type of strong porcelain.

How long will the crown last?

Properly cared for crowns should last for many years. Your dentist will be able to tell you how long the crown may be expected to last.

£382.00 - £509.00
£324.70 - £432.65
All Ceramic Crowns
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Crowns and Bridges

What is a Crown?

A Crown is an artificial restoration that fits over the remaining part of a prepared tooth, making it strong and giving it the shape of a natural tooth. A crown is sometimes known as a ‘cap’.

What is a Post Crown?

In root-filled teeth it may be necessary to insert a post before placing a crown. A post provides support and helps the crown stay in place. The weakened crown of the tooth may be shortened to gum level. A post can be made of prefabricated stainless steel or fibre white post which the dentist can fit directly into the root canal, or a custom-made post can be constructed by the dental technician to accurately fit the shape of the prepared root canal. The post is placed into the root canal and cemented in position, ready for the crown to be attached.

What is a Bridge?

A Bridge is made by putting crowns on the teeth at either side of the space, and then joining these two crowns together by placing a false tooth in the space. This is all made in the laboratory and then the pieces are cemented into place with special adhesives. The bridge can’t be removed. Another option is an adhesive bridge. This has wings that are bonded to the back of the supporting teeth with very little drilling involved.

Why would I need a crown?

Crowns are an ideal restoration for teeth that have been broken, or have been weakened by decay or a very large filling. A crown could be used for a number of other reasons, for instance: 
• you may have discoloured fillings and would like to improve the appearance of the tooth
• you may have had a root filling which will need a crown to protect it
• it may help hold a bridge or denture firmly in place.

What are crowns made of?

Crowns can be made of a variety of different materials and new materials are continually being introduced. Some of the most popular options are listed below.

Porcelain fused to metal: this is what most crowns are made from. A precious or non-precious metal base is made and then porcelain is applied in layers over it.

All-ceramic crowns: this modern technique offers a metal-free alternative, which can give the strength of a bonded crown and the appearance of a porcelain crown. Therefore it is suitable for use in all areas of the mouth.

Porcelain fused to zirconia: these crowns are the latest development in material technology in dentistry. A zirconium oxide framework is made and then porcelain applied in layers over it to give an outstandingly natural appearance.

Metal alloy crowns: gold is one of the oldest filling materials. Today it is used with other metal alloys to increase its strength, which makes it a very hardwearing restoration. These crowns are white or gold in colour.

What are bridges made of?

Bridges usually made of porcelain bonded to precious metal. Sometimes, there are other non-precious metals used in the base for strength. There are also new bridges made entirely of a special type of strong porcelain.

How long will the crown last?

Properly cared for crowns should last for many years. Your dentist will be able to tell you how long the crown may be expected to last.

£605
£514.25
Porcelain Bonded Bridge
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Crowns and Bridges

What is a Crown?

A Crown is an artificial restoration that fits over the remaining part of a prepared tooth, making it strong and giving it the shape of a natural tooth. A crown is sometimes known as a ‘cap’.

What is a Post Crown?

In root-filled teeth it may be necessary to insert a post before placing a crown. A post provides support and helps the crown stay in place. The weakened crown of the tooth may be shortened to gum level. A post can be made of prefabricated stainless steel or fibre white post which the dentist can fit directly into the root canal, or a custom-made post can be constructed by the dental technician to accurately fit the shape of the prepared root canal. The post is placed into the root canal and cemented in position, ready for the crown to be attached.

What is a Bridge?

A Bridge is made by putting crowns on the teeth at either side of the space, and then joining these two crowns together by placing a false tooth in the space. This is all made in the laboratory and then the pieces are cemented into place with special adhesives. The bridge can’t be removed. Another option is an adhesive bridge. This has wings that are bonded to the back of the supporting teeth with very little drilling involved.

Why would I need a crown?

Crowns are an ideal restoration for teeth that have been broken, or have been weakened by decay or a very large filling. A crown could be used for a number of other reasons, for instance: 
• you may have discoloured fillings and would like to improve the appearance of the tooth
• you may have had a root filling which will need a crown to protect it
• it may help hold a bridge or denture firmly in place.

What are crowns made of?

Crowns can be made of a variety of different materials and new materials are continually being introduced. Some of the most popular options are listed below.

Porcelain fused to metal: this is what most crowns are made from. A precious or non-precious metal base is made and then porcelain is applied in layers over it.

All-ceramic crowns: this modern technique offers a metal-free alternative, which can give the strength of a bonded crown and the appearance of a porcelain crown. Therefore it is suitable for use in all areas of the mouth.

Porcelain fused to zirconia: these crowns are the latest development in material technology in dentistry. A zirconium oxide framework is made and then porcelain applied in layers over it to give an outstandingly natural appearance.

Metal alloy crowns: gold is one of the oldest filling materials. Today it is used with other metal alloys to increase its strength, which makes it a very hardwearing restoration. These crowns are white or gold in colour.

What are bridges made of?

Bridges usually made of porcelain bonded to precious metal. Sometimes, there are other non-precious metals used in the base for strength. There are also new bridges made entirely of a special type of strong porcelain.

How long will the crown last?

Properly cared for crowns should last for many years. Your dentist will be able to tell you how long the crown may be expected to last.

From £764
From £649.40
All Ceramic Bridges
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Read Less >

Crowns and Bridges

What is a Crown?

A Crown is an artificial restoration that fits over the remaining part of a prepared tooth, making it strong and giving it the shape of a natural tooth. A crown is sometimes known as a ‘cap’.

What is a Post Crown?

In root-filled teeth it may be necessary to insert a post before placing a crown. A post provides support and helps the crown stay in place. The weakened crown of the tooth may be shortened to gum level. A post can be made of prefabricated stainless steel or fibre white post which the dentist can fit directly into the root canal, or a custom-made post can be constructed by the dental technician to accurately fit the shape of the prepared root canal. The post is placed into the root canal and cemented in position, ready for the crown to be attached.

What is a Bridge?

A Bridge is made by putting crowns on the teeth at either side of the space, and then joining these two crowns together by placing a false tooth in the space. This is all made in the laboratory and then the pieces are cemented into place with special adhesives. The bridge can’t be removed. Another option is an adhesive bridge. This has wings that are bonded to the back of the supporting teeth with very little drilling involved.

Why would I need a crown?

Crowns are an ideal restoration for teeth that have been broken, or have been weakened by decay or a very large filling. A crown could be used for a number of other reasons, for instance: 
• you may have discoloured fillings and would like to improve the appearance of the tooth
• you may have had a root filling which will need a crown to protect it
• it may help hold a bridge or denture firmly in place.

What are crowns made of?

Crowns can be made of a variety of different materials and new materials are continually being introduced. Some of the most popular options are listed below.

Porcelain fused to metal: this is what most crowns are made from. A precious or non-precious metal base is made and then porcelain is applied in layers over it.

All-ceramic crowns: this modern technique offers a metal-free alternative, which can give the strength of a bonded crown and the appearance of a porcelain crown. Therefore it is suitable for use in all areas of the mouth.

Porcelain fused to zirconia: these crowns are the latest development in material technology in dentistry. A zirconium oxide framework is made and then porcelain applied in layers over it to give an outstandingly natural appearance.

Metal alloy crowns: gold is one of the oldest filling materials. Today it is used with other metal alloys to increase its strength, which makes it a very hardwearing restoration. These crowns are white or gold in colour.

What are bridges made of?

Bridges usually made of porcelain bonded to precious metal. Sometimes, there are other non-precious metals used in the base for strength. There are also new bridges made entirely of a special type of strong porcelain.

How long will the crown last?

Properly cared for crowns should last for many years. Your dentist will be able to tell you how long the crown may be expected to last.

From £1284
From £1091.40
Adhesive Bridge
Read More >
Read Less >

Crowns and Bridges

What is a Crown?

A Crown is an artificial restoration that fits over the remaining part of a prepared tooth, making it strong and giving it the shape of a natural tooth. A crown is sometimes known as a ‘cap’.

What is a Post Crown?

In root-filled teeth it may be necessary to insert a post before placing a crown. A post provides support and helps the crown stay in place. The weakened crown of the tooth may be shortened to gum level. A post can be made of prefabricated stainless steel or fibre white post which the dentist can fit directly into the root canal, or a custom-made post can be constructed by the dental technician to accurately fit the shape of the prepared root canal. The post is placed into the root canal and cemented in position, ready for the crown to be attached.

What is a Bridge?

A Bridge is made by putting crowns on the teeth at either side of the space, and then joining these two crowns together by placing a false tooth in the space. This is all made in the laboratory and then the pieces are cemented into place with special adhesives. The bridge can’t be removed. Another option is an adhesive bridge. This has wings that are bonded to the back of the supporting teeth with very little drilling involved.

Why would I need a crown?

Crowns are an ideal restoration for teeth that have been broken, or have been weakened by decay or a very large filling. A crown could be used for a number of other reasons, for instance: 
• you may have discoloured fillings and would like to improve the appearance of the tooth
• you may have had a root filling which will need a crown to protect it
• it may help hold a bridge or denture firmly in place.

What are crowns made of?

Crowns can be made of a variety of different materials and new materials are continually being introduced. Some of the most popular options are listed below.

Porcelain fused to metal: this is what most crowns are made from. A precious or non-precious metal base is made and then porcelain is applied in layers over it.

All-ceramic crowns: this modern technique offers a metal-free alternative, which can give the strength of a bonded crown and the appearance of a porcelain crown. Therefore it is suitable for use in all areas of the mouth.

Porcelain fused to zirconia: these crowns are the latest development in material technology in dentistry. A zirconium oxide framework is made and then porcelain applied in layers over it to give an outstandingly natural appearance.

Metal alloy crowns: gold is one of the oldest filling materials. Today it is used with other metal alloys to increase its strength, which makes it a very hardwearing restoration. These crowns are white or gold in colour.

What are bridges made of?

Bridges usually made of porcelain bonded to precious metal. Sometimes, there are other non-precious metals used in the base for strength. There are also new bridges made entirely of a special type of strong porcelain.

How long will the crown last?

Properly cared for crowns should last for many years. Your dentist will be able to tell you how long the crown may be expected to last.

£463
£393.55
Metal Denture
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Dental Prostheics

What is a denture?

People wear dentures to replace lost or missing teeth so they can enjoy a healthy diet and smile with confidence. Dentures are made of either acrylic (plastic) or metal.
A ‘complete’ or ‘full’ denture is one which replaces all the natural teeth in either the upper or lower jaws.
A ‘partial’ denture fills in the spaces left by lost or missing teeth. It may be fastened to your natural teeth with metal clasps or ‘precision attachments’.

What are dentures made of?

The base of a denture is called a plate and can be made of either acrylic (plastic) or metal. The teeth are normally made of acrylic and can be made to match your natural teeth. This is especially important in the case of partial dentures.

Will dentures make me feel different?

Replacing lost or missing teeth is very good for your health and appearance. A complete or full denture replaces your natural teeth and gives support to your cheeks and lips. Without this support, sagging facial muscles can make a person look older and they will find it harder to eat and speak properly. Dentures can be made to closely match your natural teeth so that your appearance hardly changes. Modern dentures may even improve the look of your smile and help fill out the appearance of your face.

Will I be able to eat with dentures?

Eating will take a little practice. Start with soft foods cut into small pieces. Chew slowly using both sides of your mouth at the same time to prevent the denture from moving. As you become more used to your denture, add other foods until you return to your normal healthy diet.

How soon can I have a denture after my teeth are taken out?

Usually dentures can be fitted straight after your teeth have been removed. These are called ‘immediate dentures’. You visit the dentist beforehand for them to take measurements and impressions of your mouth. With immediate dentures you don’t have to be without teeth while your gums are healing. However, bone and gums can shrink over time, especially during the first six months after your teeth have been taken out. If your gums shrink, your immediate dentures may need relining, adjusting or even replacing. Your dentist will be able to discuss this with you. Sometimes your dentist may advise you to wait until your gums are healed before having your dentures, as this can sometimes provide a better fit. Healing may take several months.

Are dentures my only option?

No. Implants are another option to consider. Ask your dentist for more information on this. You will find more information in our “Dental Implant” page or ask a member of our team.

£635.00 - £1147.00
£539.75 - £974.95 
Full Dentures
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Dental Prosthetics

What is a denture?

People wear dentures to replace lost or missing teeth so they can enjoy a healthy diet and smile with confidence. Dentures are made of either acrylic (plastic) or metal.
A ‘complete’ or ‘full’ denture is one which replaces all the natural teeth in either the upper or lower jaws.
A ‘partial’ denture fills in the spaces left by lost or missing teeth. It may be fastened to your natural teeth with metal clasps or ‘precision attachments’.

What are dentures made of?

The base of a denture is called a plate and can be made of either acrylic (plastic) or metal. The teeth are normally made of acrylic and can be made to match your natural teeth. This is especially important in the case of partial dentures.

Will dentures make me feel different?

Replacing lost or missing teeth is very good for your health and appearance. A complete or full denture replaces your natural teeth and gives support to your cheeks and lips. Without this support, sagging facial muscles can make a person look older and they will find it harder to eat and speak properly. Dentures can be made to closely match your natural teeth so that your appearance hardly changes. Modern dentures may even improve the look of your smile and help fill out the appearance of your face.

Will I be able to eat with dentures?

Eating will take a little practice. Start with soft foods cut into small pieces. Chew slowly using both sides of your mouth at the same time to prevent the denture from moving. As you become more used to your denture, add other foods until you return to your normal healthy diet.

How soon can I have a denture after my teeth are taken out?

Usually dentures can be fitted straight after your teeth have been removed. These are called ‘immediate dentures’. You visit the dentist beforehand for them to take measurements and impressions of your mouth. With immediate dentures you don’t have to be without teeth while your gums are healing. However, bone and gums can shrink over time, especially during the first six months after your teeth have been taken out. If your gums shrink, your immediate dentures may need relining, adjusting or even replacing. Your dentist will be able to discuss this with you. Sometimes your dentist may advise you to wait until your gums are healed before having your dentures, as this can sometimes provide a better fit. Healing may take several months.

Are dentures my only option?

No. Implants are another option to consider. Ask your dentist for more information on this. You will find more information in our “Dental Implant” page or ask a member of our team.

£579.00 - £1147.00
£492.15 - £974.95
Emergency Appointment
£63.00
£53.55 
Root Canal Treatment
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Endodontic Therapy

What is root canal treatment?

Root canal treatment (also called endodontics) is needed when the blood or nerve supply of the tooth (known as the pulp) is infected through decay or injury.

Why is root canal treatment needed?

If the pulp becomes infected, the infection may spread through the root canal system of the tooth. This may eventually lead to an abscess. If root canal treatment (RCT) is not carried out, the infection will spread and the tooth may need to be taken out.

What does it involve?

The aim of the treatment is to remove all infection from the root canal. The root is then cleaned and filled to prevent any further infection. Root canal treatment is a skilled and time-consuming procedure. Most courses of treatment will involve two or more visits to your dentist. At the first appointment, the infected pulp is removed. Any abscesses, which may be present, can also be drained at this time. The root canal is then cleaned and shaped ready for the filling. A temporary filling is put in and the tooth is left to settle. The tooth is checked at a later visit and when all the infection has cleared, the tooth is permanently filled.

What if I don’t have the treatment?

The alternative is to have the tooth out. Once the pulp is destroyed, it can’t heal and it is not recommended to leave an infected tooth in the mouth. Although some people would prefer an extraction, it is usually best to keep as many natural teeth as possible.

What about aftercare?

Root-treated teeth should be treated just the same as any other tooth. Remember to clean your teeth at least once a day, preferably with a fluoride toothpaste. Cut down on sugary snacks, and keep them only to mealtimes if possible. See your dentist for regular check-ups.

£242
£205.70
Cosmetic Whitening
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Tooth Whitening

What is tooth whitening?

Tooth Whitening is the simplest and most affordable way to brighten your smile. We use an ‘at home’ technique using customised bleaching trays made just for you. The ‘at home’ technique allows you total control of the final shade. It is safe and easy to do.

Why would I need my teeth whitened?

There are a number of reasons why you might get your teeth whitened. Everyone is different; and just as our hair and skin colour vary, so do our teeth. Very few people have brilliant-white teeth, and our teeth can also become more discoloured as we get older.

Your teeth can also be stained on the surface through food and drinks such as tea, coffee, red wine and blackcurrant. Smoking can also stain teeth.

Calculus or tartar can also affect the colour of teeth. Some people may have staining under the surface, which can be caused by certain antibiotics or tiny cracks in the teeth which take up stains.

What does tooth whitening involve?

We have found that the most effective way to whiten teeth is with home bleaching trays. Your dentist will take impressions of your mouth and from these will construct special trays that will fit your mouth like fine gum shields. Whitening gel is placed in these trays either overnight or for a convenient period during the day for a duration of 3 – 4 weeks. The active ingredient is usually hydrogen peroxide or carbomide peroxide. As the active ingredient is broken down, oxygen gets into the enamel on the teeth and the tooth colour is made lighter.

How long does tooth whitening take?

Usually 3 – 4 weeks.

How long will my teeth stay whiter?

The effects of whitening can last up to three years. However, this will vary from person to person. The effect is less likely to last as long if you smoke, or eat or drink products that can stain your teeth. Ask your dentist for their opinion before you start the treatment.

What are the side effects?

Some people may find that their teeth become sensitive to cold during or after the treatment. Others report discomfort in the gums, a sore throat or white patches on the gum line. These symptoms are usually temporary and should disappear within a few days of the treatment finishing.
If any of these side effects continue you should go to your dentist.

How can I look after my teeth once they have been whitened?

You can help to keep your teeth white by cutting down on the amount of food and drink you have that can stain teeth. Don’t forget, stopping smoking can also help prevent discolouring and staining.

£380
£323
Cosmetic Veneers
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Cosmetic Dentistry

What is a veneer?

A  veneer  is  a  thin  layer  of  porcelain  made  to  fit  over  the  front  surface  of  a tooth,  like  a  false  fingernail  fits  over  a  nail.  Sometimes a  natural-colour ‘composite' material is used instead of porcelain.

When would I need a veneer?

Veneers can improve the colour, shape and position of your teeth. A precise shade of porcelain can be chosen to give the right colour to improve a single discoloured tooth or to lighten your front teeth. A veneer can make a chipped tooth  look  whole  again. The porcelain  covers  the  whole  of  the  front  of  the tooth, with a thicker section replacing the  broken part. Veneers can also be used to close small gaps, when orthodontics (braces) are not suitable. If one tooth is slightly out of position, a veneer can sometimes be fitted to bring it into line with the others.

What are the advantages of veneers?

Veneers make teeth look natural and healthy. Because they are very thin and are held in place by a special, strong adhesive, very little preparation of the tooth is needed. Some types of veneers only need very minimal preparation.

How are teeth prepared for a veneer?

Some  of  the  shiny,  outer  enamel  surface  of  the tooth may be removed, to make sure that the veneer can be bonded permanently in place later. The amount of enamel removed is tiny and will be the same as the thickness of the veneer to be fitted, so that the tooth stays the same size. A local anaesthetic (injection) may be used to make sure that there is no discomfort, but often this is not needed. Once the tooth has been prepared, the dental team will take an ‘impression' (mould). This will be given to the dental  technician, along with any other information needed to make the veneer. The colour of the surrounding teeth is matched on a shade guide to make sure that the veneer will look entirely natural.

How long will it take?

A veneer takes at least two visits. The first is to prepare the tooth and match the shade, and the second is to fit it. Before bonding it in place, your dentist will show you the veneer on your tooth to make sure you are happy with it. Bonding a veneer in place is done with a special adhesive, which holds it firmly on the tooth.

Will I need a temporary veneer between visits?

Because the preparation of the tooth is so slight you will probably not need a temporary veneer. The tooth will look very much the same after preparation, but will feel slightly less smooth.

What happens after the veneer is fitted?

Only minor adjustments can be mad  to the veneer after it is fitted. It is usually best to wait a little while to get used to it before any changes  are made. 

How long will a veneer last?

Veneers should last for many years; but they can chip or break, just like your own teeth can. Your dental team will tell you how long each veneer should last. Small chips can be repaired, or a new veneer fitted if necessary.

What about alternatives?

A natural-coloured filling material can be used for minor repairs  to front teeth. This is excellent when the tooth can support a filling, but may not work so  well  for  broken  tooth  corners. There  will always be a join between the tooth and the filling material.

Crowns are used for teeth which need to be strengthened - either because they have broken, have been weakened by a very large filling, or have had root canal treatment.

£319.00 - £447.00
£217.15 - £379.95
Mouth Guard
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Mouth Guards

What is a mouthguard?

A mouthguard is a specially made, rubber-like cover which fits exactly over your teeth and gums, cushioning them and protecting them from damage.

When would I need a mouthguard?

It is important to wear a professionally made mouthguard whenever you play sport that involves physical contact or moving objects. This includes: cricket, hockey and football - which can cause broken and damaged teeth; and American football, boxing and rugby - which can all cause broken or dislocated jaws. A mouthguard will help protect against these happening.

Where can I get one made?

Your dental team will be happy to make you a custom-made mouthguard, which will fit your mouth exactly and protect your teeth and gums properly. Custom-made mouthguards can prevent damage to the jaw, neck and even the brain - helping to prevent the concussion and damage caused by a heavy blow.

How much will it cost?

Costs can vary from dentist to dentist. Ask your dental team about mouthguards and always get an estimate before starting treatment. When you consider the cost of expensive dental work and the risk of losing teeth, it is a small price to pay for peace of mind.

How long do custom-made mouthguards last?

Depending on your age, your mouthguard may need replacing fairly regularly. If you are still growing, new teeth will come through and move into position. So the mouthguard may become too tight or loose, and will need to be remade to fit the new shape of your mouth.

Adults may not need to have their mouthguards replaced quite so often. But they are like any other form of sports equipment and will suffer from wear and tear. It is recommended that you take  your mouthguard along to the dentist when you go for your check-up, so it can be checked.

What about home kits?

Mouthguards are made by taking an accurate impression of your mouth and making the mouthguard fit your own teeth. The dentist will note the way your jaws bite together to make sure the mouthguard  meets properly with your teeth.

There are cheaper kits available. They involve heating the product in hot water and then putting it in your mouth until it sets. Unfortunately, these mouthguards can fit badly and be uncomfortable to wear. They can fall out or even  cause  choking. Also the material is at its thinnest where it is needed most.

Can I get coloured mouthguards?

There are many types of  mouthguard  including  striped,  multi-coloured and clear.  Many people now have coloured mouthguards made in their favourite team's  colours or to match their own sports strip. Your dental team will be able to tell you whether they can provide coloured mouthguards.

£63.00
£53.55
Dental Implants
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Dental Implants

What are dental implants?

Dental implants are often the best thing to replace missing teeth. They take the place of the tooth roots and support crowns and bridges and may be used to stabilise loose dentures.

Dental implants are generally made from titanium and are placed into your jaw bone.

Are implants safe? How long will they last?

Implants are a well-established, tried-and-tested treatment. 95 per cent of modern implants should last for many years with the right care.

I have some of my own teeth. Can I still have implants?

Yes. You can have any number of teeth replaced with implants – from one single tooth to a complete set.

Can implants always be used to replace missing teeth?

It depends on the state of the bone in your jaw. Your dentist will arrange for a number of special tests to assess the amount of bone still there. If there is not enough, or if it isn’t healthy enough, it may not be possible to place implants without grafting bone into the area first.

Do implants hurt?

Placing the implants requires a small operation. This can be done using a simple local anaesthetic, and sometimes with sedation if you are very nervous. Sometimes the dentist needs to use a general anaesthetic for complex cases. You will not feel any pain at the time, but you may feel some discomfort during the week after the surgery. This is usually due to having stitches, and the normal healing process.

How soon can I have the new teeth?

Usually it is 6 to 12 weeks before the final teeth can be placed on the implants. The implants need to bond (integrate) with the bone after they have been put in. Sometimes implants may be stable enough when they are fitted for the artificial teeth to be attached immediately. If you are having one, two or three teeth replaced, you will have a temporary restoration in the meantime. If you have complete dentures, then these can be worn throughout the healing period once they have been modified after the surgery.

Is the treatment expensive?

Your Implantologist will be able to provide you with a written estimate of cost. However, over the longer term, implants are usually a more cost-effective and satisfactory option.

From £2000
From £2000
Facial Aesthetic Treatments
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We have a range of Facial Aesthetic Treatments available to you in the comfort of a clinical environment.

Simple, non-surgical treatments which are fast and effective at combating problem areas.

Frown lines, nose to mouth lines, lips and foreheads are just some of the areas which can be treated to give a more refreshed appearance.

Treatments on offer include Botulinium Type A and Collagen Replacement therapy.

From £200
From £170
Oral Surgery
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Oral Surgery

What is Oral Surgery?

Oral Surgery has a wide scope and it includes simple tooth extraction, minor surgical extractions such as extraction of an impacted wisdom tooth and surgical biopsies.

What are the main reasons for taking wisdom teeth out?

Far fewer wisdom teeth are now taken out than in the past. If the tooth is not causing problems, your dentist will not want to remove it. They will only remove wisdom teeth:
• when it is clear that they will not be able to come through into a useful position because there is not enough room, and they are also causing some pain or discomfort
• if they have only partly come through and are decayed – such teeth will often decay as it will be difficult to clean them as thoroughly as your other teeth
• if they are painful.

What are the main reasons for taking wisdom teeth out?

It all depends on the position and the shape of the roots. Your dentist will tell you how easy or difficult each tooth will be to remove after looking at the x-rays. Upper wisdom teeth are often easier to remove than lower ones, which are more likely to be impacted. Your dentist will say whether the tooth should be taken out at the dental practice, or whether you should be referred to a specialist (oral surgeon) at a hospital. Very occasionally there is a possibility of some numbness of the lip after the removal of a lower tooth – your dentist will tell you if it is possible in your case.
Either local anaesthetic – as you would have for a filling – or sedation will probably be recommended. A general anaesthetic (where you would be asleep), can also be used, but this will only be given in a hospital.

What should I expect after a wisdom tooth is taken out?

The amount of discomfort will depend on how easy the removal of the tooth was. There is usually some swelling and discomfort for a few days afterwards, and it is important to follow any advice you get about mouthwashes etc, to help with the healing. Some people also find homeopathic remedies help to reduce discomfort. Usual pain-killers such as paracetamol, aspirin or ibuprofen will usually deal with any pain. It is best to stay fairly quiet and relaxed and avoid smoking and drinking for 24 hours afterwards to make sure there are no bleeding problems. There may be some stitches to help the gum heal over – your dentist will probably want to see you again about a week later to check on the healing, and to remove any stitches.

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Cosmetic Dentistry
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Cosmetic Dentistry

What is cosmetic dentistry?

Dentistry is no longer just a case of filling and extracting teeth, as it was for many years. Nowadays, many people turn to cosmetic dentistry, or ‘aesthetic dentistry’, as a way of improving their appearance, much as they would use cosmetic surgery or even a new hairstyle. The treatments can be used to straighten, lighten, reshape and repair teeth. Cosmetic treatments include veneers, crowns, bridges and tooth-coloured fillings.

What is a veneer?

Veneers are thin slices of porcelain. These are precisely made to fit over the visible surface of front teeth, like a false fingernail fits over a nail.

Why might I have a veneer?

Veneers are an ideal way of treating discoloured or unsightly teeth, closing gaps between front teeth, or repairing chips and cracks.

Can I use veneers to close the gaps between my front teeth?

Yes. Again, using tooth-coloured material or porcelain, the dentist can change the shape or size of the tooth very slightly, closing the gap between the teeth.

Can I have white fillings?

For over 150 years standard fillings have been made out of a silvery-grey material called ‘amalgam’. This is still one of the strongest and longest-lasting materials available for fillings. However, many people find it unattractive and some are concerned about possible health risks. 
White fillings are now becoming a popular alternative to amalgam fillings. The new dental materials mean it is much easier to find a perfect match for the shade of a particular tooth. In most cases, it is quite impossible to see that the tooth even has a filling.

My tooth is badly broken – what can I do?

When a tooth is badly broken or heavily filled, the dentist may need to crown or ‘cap’ it to restore its appearance and strength

How does the dentist make a crown?

The usual procedure for fitting a crown involves shaping the tooth under local anaesthetic and then taking an impression using a rubber-like material. The impression is then sent to the laboratory along with the details of the shade to be used, where the technician makes the crown.

What happens to my teeth while the crown is being made?

While your crown is being made, the prepared tooth can be protected with a temporary crown, which is easily removed just before fitting the permanent one. In most cases, the temporary crown is in place for about two weeks.

What is a crown made of?

Crowns can be made of a variety of different materials, such as porcelain or porcelain bonded to gold. New materials are continually being introduced. There are different crowns for different situations and it is a good idea to discuss with your dentist which crown would be best for you.

I have a gap – should I have it closed?

If a tooth is missing, or needs extracting, there are several ways to fill the gap that is left. In some cases it is important to try to replace any missing teeth in order to balance the way your jaw bites. If you have several missing teeth, the remaining teeth are under more pressure, which can lead to broken fillings or even jaw problems.

How can my dentist fill the gap?

A partial denture is the simplest way of replacing missing teeth. However, some people find dentures uncomfortable and eventually decide to have a bridge made.

What is a bridge?

Bridges are ideal for people who don’t like dentures or only have one or two teeth missing. Conventional bridges are made by crowning the teeth on either side of the gap and attaching a false tooth in the middle. They are fixed in the same way as crowns. These bridges are usually made of precious metal bonded to porcelain. Sometimes other non-precious metals are used in the base for strength.

What if I don’t want my remaining teeth drilled?

Adhesive bridges are another way of bridging a gap, and less of the tooth needs removing. These bridges are made up of a false tooth with metal ‘wings’ on either side. These wings are made to bond to the teeth on either side, with very little drilling of these teeth. The teeth are roughened and the bridge is fitted using a very strong composite resin. 
‘Implants’ are an alternative to dentures or bridgework, but they are more expensive. Implants are titanium rods, which are surgically placed into the jawbone, leaving parts sticking out through the gum. These act as anchors for fastening dentures or crowns onto.

Can my crooked or twisted teeth be straightened?

Teeth can be straightened with orthodontics (braces). This is usually done during the teenage years, when the teeth are going through a period of growth. However, many adults also have treatment to straighten their crooked teeth or to approve their appearance. The procedure can take much longer in adults and is therefore more expensive.

Are there any alternatives to orthodontics?

Cosmetic contouring can be used to improve the appearance of teeth. It is ideal if you have slightly crowded teeth. It takes about one hour and is less expensive than other forms of cosmetic treatment. It is not recommended for young children.

What is tooth whitening?

Tooth whitening can be a highly effective way of lightening the natural colour of your teeth without removing any of the tooth surfaces. It cannot make a complete colour change, but it will lighten the existing shade.

Why would I need my teeth whitened?

There are a number of reasons why you might get your teeth whitened. Everyone is different; and just as our hair and skin colour vary, so do our teeth. Very few people have brilliant-white teeth, and our teeth can also become more discoloured as we get older.
Your teeth can also be stained on the surface through food and drinks such as tea, coffee, red wine and blackcurrant. Smoking can also stain teeth.
Calculus or tartar can also affect the colour of teeth. Some people may have staining under the surface, which can be caused by certain antibiotics or tiny cracks in the teeth which take up stains.

What does tooth whitening involve?

We have found that the most effective way to whiten teeth is with home bleaching trays. Your dentist will take impressions of your mouth and from these will construct special trays that will fit your mouth like fine gum shields. Whitening gel is placed in these trays overnight for a period of 3 – 4 weeks. The active ingredient is usually hydrogen peroxide or carbomide peroxide. As the active ingredient is broken down, oxygen gets into the enamel on the teeth and the tooth colour is made lighter.

How long does tooth whitening take?

Usually 3 – 4 weeks.

How long will my teeth stay whiter?

The effects of whitening can last up to three years. However, this will vary from person to person. The effect is less likely to last as long if you smoke, or eat or drink products that can stain your teeth. Ask your dentist for their opinion before you start the treatment.

What are the side effects?

Some people may find that their teeth become sensitive to cold during or after the treatment. Others report discomfort in the gums, a sore throat or white patches on the gum line. These symptoms are usually temporary and should disappear within a few days of the treatment finishing. 
If any of these side effects continue you should go to your dentist.

How can I look after my teeth once they have been whitened?

You can help to keep your teeth white by cutting down on the amount of food and drink you have that can stain teeth. Don’t forget, stopping smoking can also help prevent discolouring and staining.

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NHS Treatments

NHS treatment will provide a reasonable standard of care for most routine procedures.

NHS charges are set by the government and are standard for all NHS patients. The charges are assessed each year and usually change every April. 

Some people do not have to pay including those receiving benefits, children, pregnant women and nursing mothers. 

Some, mainly cosmetic treatments, are not available on the NHS.

NHS Prices

Private Dentistry

Caledonian Dental Care offers private dental treatment which provides you with a high quality dental service.

Longer chair side time for treatments, greater flexibility with appointment times, no limitations in types of treatments including cosmetic treatments which are not available under the NHS such as: 

• Tooth Whitening
• White Fillings for Back Teeth
• Tooth Coloured Inlays
• Dental Implants

How to Book

Budget for the cost of monitoring your dental health with Denplan Essentials

Find Out More